Giving Thanks!

One of the themes that has been present throughout the program so far is giving thanks, whether to our Elders, before eating a meal, or when we wake up in the morning.

So now it is time to give thanks to our funders. Because of their generosity and faith in the program, we can offer unique opportunities for our Native youth this summer and beyond.

San Manuel Band of Mission Indians has been a strong and continual supporter of the Pipeline Program since day 1!

Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians has also seen that the vision and mission of the Pipeline Program is one to support for the future generations.

Lummi Nation and the Lummi Youth Academy are both recent but strong supporters of the Pipeline Program, entrusting us with a big group of their students. Thank you!

Thank you to both the Assistance League of Bellingham and the Whatcom Community Foundation for supporting the travel and journeys of the Lummi girls as they learn and grow.

The CHIAT FOUNDATION – one of our small local foundations, the Chiat Foundation has supported the program continuously. Thank you for choosing to support small and local!

These Individual Donors from Washington State who have generously supported the travels and experiences of the Lummi students.

Deborah L Granger
C.A. Peter Granger
Donald Paulson
Claudia Callahan
Ursula Zvilna
Beth Brownfield
Gary Piazzon
Dianne Deseck Piazzon

The Wishtoyo Foundation is responsible for the Chumash Village in Malibu, CA. We have teamed up with Wishtoyo since 2013 to spend a few days at the Village learning about marine science and Chumash culture. They have been amazing hosts and the food is always the best. Thank you for always hosting us in a good way.

 Our continual host campus and organization – Pitzer College. More specifically, the Community Engagement Center has been our command base and the Dean of Faculty’s Office has supported our endeavors as well. Gloria Gold – Hello Gold Center next to our dorm! – has also generously supported the Pipeline Program in its mission to educate Native youth.

 
Western University of Health Sciences is our partner in the program and helps us with getting grants and managing funding. They also provide the awesome and interesting health science curriculum. So far we have learned about genetics and diseases, both fascinating topics and good introductions into the health fields.

Pitzer College Article on the Program (We’re famous!…)

http://pitweb.pitzer.edu/communications/2015/07/pitzer-welcomes-native-american-students-to-pipeline-program/

Pitzer Welcomes Native American Students to Pipeline Program

Claremont, CA (July 12, 2015)—Twenty Native American high school students arrived at Pitzer College today for a two-week residential program that is designed to prepare them for success in higher education—both academically and culturally.

The Pitzer College/WesternU’s Native American Summer Pipeline to College Program, co-sponsored by Western University of Health Sciences and run by Pitzer’s Community Engagement Center, will focus on the humanities and health sciences while helping students build academic skills for college. The Pipeline Program is the only program of its kind with a Native science component, which encompasses traditional approaches in areas such as the environment, marine life and food.

The Pipeline Program goes beyond the standard approach to academics. According to Program Director Scott Scoggins ’10, the Pipeline Program draws on Native American scholars and Elders’ wisdom to contribute cultural knowledge and traditional ways of learning within the academic environment. Two Canadian Elders—Rose Henry (Tla’ A’min Nation (Sliammon Territory)) and Joe Thorne (Cowichan/Nuu-chah-nulth)—are the program Elders-in-Residence, who offer students and mentors alike opportunities to learn from Elders in an informal setting. On July 24, the Elders will also co-lead a rally for Idle No More, a grassroots movement dedicated to building Indigenous sovereignty and protecting the environment.

“To succeed in life, you need to be strong in your culture,” Scoggins said. “We can’t prepare the students properly unless they’re backed up by their culture.” Scoggins himself is of Pipil Nahuat, Pocoman Maya and English ancestry.

The program, now in its seventh year, offers a new component this year called Generation Indigenous (Gen I), a White House initiative in collaboration with the Center for Native American Youth and the Aspen Center. To meet Gen I’s challenge to support college access and youth development, the Pipeline Program youth will create a booklet, “A Survival Guide for Native American Youth by Native American Youth.” The booklet will encourage students to express themselves through writing and tell their own stories. Five mentors, some of them former Pipeline students, will assist.

Other programming includes reflective essay writing drawn from the reading The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie, an earth science class with Elder Kim Marcus (Santa Rosa Cahuilla) and Elder Barbara Marcus (Spokane), building a Tongva kiiy and rabbit loom with Tongva Elder Barbara Drake and an ever-popular media studies course on blogging led by Pitzer Media Studies Professor Gina Lamb. At Western University of Health Sciences, students will learn about the Thrifty Genotype hypothesis, population genetics and different health careers.

Students will also visit Wishtoyo Foundation’s Chumash Village in Malibu for a three-day camping experience in traditional Chumash homes called “aps.” They will study plant identification, marine biology conservation and land stewardship.

Over the years, Scoggins has seen once shy young people who often lack trust in academia transformed through their shared experiences in the program.

“I see strong young people with hope for the future, with confidence in an academic setting and with their culture backing them up to make them even stronger,” Scoggins said.

For more information, please visit:

http://pitweb.pitzer.edu/cec/native-american-engagement/

www.nativeyouth2college.org

www.westernu.edu/ladder-american-indian/about.php

ABOUT PITZER COLLEGE

Pitzer College is a nationally top-ranked undergraduate liberal arts and sciences institution. A member of The Claremont Colleges, Pitzer offers a distinctive approach to a liberal arts education by linking intellectual inquiry with interdisciplinary studies, cultural immersion, social responsibility and community involvement. For more information, please visit www.pitzer.edu.

2015 Pitzer College/WesternU’s Natives 2 College Pipeline Program Application!

CHECK IT OUT!!!

The 2015 Pitzer College/WesternU’s Natives 2 College Pipeline Program Student Application will be here tomorrow (technically here already except on the West Coast)!

We have made a lot of new changes, so please take the time to carefully read all the new directions/program changes and GET EXCITED!!!

Highlights of the exciting activities for summer 2015 will come soon. For now, tell your friends and family and urge them to fill out an application.

– The Pipeline Program

2014 Pipeline Application Countdown: 3 Days!

2014 Pipeline Applications are due in 3 DAYS (April 11th)!!

You can turn them in by:

Mail: Send to Scott Scoggins, Pitzer College CEC, 1050 North Mills Ave, Claremont, CA 91711

Email: Send as a PDF or JPEG to scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu

Fax: Send C/O Scott Scoggins to 909-607-8758

Please make sure your application is filled out properly, all questions answered, and all essays/recommendation forms/transcripts/etc attached!

If you need an extension on the deadline, please contact Scott Scoggins immediately!

2014 Pipeline Applications Due Soon!

Just a gentle Reminder

2014 Pipeline Applications are due in 8 days (April 11th)!!

You can turn them in by:

Mail: Send to Scott Scoggins, Pitzer College CEC, 1050 North Mills Ave, Claremont, CA 91711

Email: Send as a PDF or JPEG to scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu

Fax: Send C/O Scott Scoggins to 909.607.8758

Download your application Today!