Weaving Worlds of Medicine by James Fenelon

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The weaving of modern medicine and native medicine is key to the progression of the medical field. As mentioned by Dr. Henson, old native sources of foods like the Chaga mushroom can be the answer to complex illnesses like cancer. Bradley Henson was pushed to desperation to find a treatment for his father’s liver cancer. He then turned to the Chaga mushroom of his ancestors. This treatment helped significantly with his father’s illness. While we cannot dismiss the major leaps forward we’ve had in modern medicine, we should consider treatments from different cultural backgrounds on an equal playing field when doing tests. Native communities hold more answers than we think, we just have to learn to listen.

Ja-Rey in her element

announcement.

My best friend was shipped in last night to start the NY2C program a whole week late. Yeah a whoooole long week but she was at another summer camp so ya know it was all good. This passed week we had been disconnected from the world obsessed with speed and slowed down a bit to ground ourselves with the love of culture. We were invited to Wishtoyo and got to stay 4 great days on the restored village site of the Chumash people. I cant even begin to explain the amount of love I felt leaving those lands on our final day.  Those who have dedicated their lives to the culture and who took time to greet and care for us those 4 days are the most amazing people I have every meet. We did so many activities, like kayaking and snorkeling on Limuw island which is the origin place of the Chumash people. through all of that my most beautiful memory d at Wishtoyo is spending many hours of the day learning Chumash native songs and stories. sitting in front of the fire offering prays  was the best night. It reminded me of the pwoer within our culture and ourselves. It was an amazing experience and ooooh i slept outside every night too. (fun fact: you cant see the moon because of light pollution from the city)

Trip to Western U by Benjamin

The trip took a short time to get there. We couldn’t find a parking spot for a while but eventually we found one. We did a blessing ceremony so the bad spirits won’t follow us. Some of us went into the cadaver to see the human heart. Studying it was great and knowing the differences between the vessels and veins were nice. Holding the heart felt hard but squishy at the same time. I learned that the fat that covers the heart is the same thickness as the fat on a sheep, mmmmmmmm mutton! There was 6 stations about the human body, I only went to 2 of them sadly. I had a great day there, so much fun!!

Maya’s Fifth Day

I’ve been feeling pretty cruddy the last two or three days, so this morning I sat out of martial arts. I was a bit disappointed but the rest of the day made up for it. I napped through morning classes and when i woke up I didn’t feel as sick and my body was most definitely more rested. Then we went to Western U after lunch and get this- I held a freshly harvested human heart! I did throw up in my mouth a little, but for sure an interesting experience. Then came the virtual reality lab! The technology was incredible. Falling down the trachea almost felt real. Afterwards came dinner. Then today in theatre we talked about traditions. 

 

Catch these photos.

claapper sticks
Fun with clapper sticks!
dancing with sadie
Dancing with Sadie
ham
Hammin it up
making the altar
Making the altar
mesquite pancakes
Mesquite pancakes!
my rock
Placing on the altar
pool day
Pool day

Native Youth to College Progam and the GenI Challenge

Last Summer (2015), the students of Pitzer/WesternU’s Native Youth to College Program took on the Generation Indigenous Challenge by President Obama and the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY).

The Generation Indigenous Challenge asks Native youth “to work with other youth in their community or at their school to do something positive of their choosing [within 30 days of accepting the challenge].”

Our Result?

Finding Our Way to College. A book by Native Youth for Native Youth.

http://issuu.com/nativeyouth2college/docs/nativeyouth2collegefinal

Finding Our Way to College is a survival guide filled with practical advice, tips, and stories from Native Youth to College students navigating the college application process.

“My goal is to get to college, and I’ve motivated myself to make new connections in the Indian community around the world. I’d like to share my experiences and offer those opportunities to help you apply too! As royalty and a senior, I want to be a role model for others and show them the guidance, motivation, and support.”

“About 1% of American Indians attend my high school and most of them fail classes. We have an American Indian meetings every month and I want to tell them about this program and let them know that it can help them with college experiences and future College applications. However, if they are not interested in this program, I can give them tips about creating their College App. I want everyone to be successful and happy with where they are, especially my people.”

Take some time to flip through the book and read it. Share it with your friends, family, community, and school.

2015 Native Youth to College session students, we are proud of you for working so hard on this, sharing your experiences, telling your story, and being role models for other youth. 

A shout out to Gina Lamb, Pitzer Media Studies Professor, Edwin Gomez, and other Media studies students who worked on getting this ready for us!

#GenI #NativeYouth #TellingYourStory #GenerationIndigenous #Challenge