Reflection about the last few days- Ben

Two days ago we basket weaved and it was a great experience! Although I did it last year, I still needed to get help. While I was in the middle of my basket, my main part of the basket broke on me. So I ended up doing a small basket but it still turned out great. Yesterday we had a class about “what we are leaving behind?”. It was a good topic because it made me think about what I’m going to contribute to the next generation.  Today we had a talk about Green energy and jobs. The topic was good and the people that presented the information made me want to see about that career. After that we had a tour of Pomona College and it expanded my mind to this opportunity. I found out some information and I’m considering the college but I’m still not sure about my career choice, lol. Just after that we had a class about Anatomy and Animation. It was cool but the coolest part was meeting a lady who did designs in movies I watched as a kid. It was like meeting a celebrity. Today was very productive and I hope the next few days are going to be the same.

Advertisements

Ja-Rey sweats and protects

so honeyyyy, 

Today we were giving the opportunity to play an indigenous game called Mexica flower wars. The objective of the game was to capture the warriors who were carrying sacred staffs by touching the tops of their opponents heads. It really wasn’t as easy as it sounds. The day before we learned how to protect over self using indigenous martial arts.  we learn to block our heads and our stomachs but also learned how to move energy. Our instructor, Hector Pacheco reminded us how disciplined our ancestors were by cultivating a focus atmosphere within the students. He taught us the knowledge behind the game and how those with the sacred staffs represent future generations. The goal for the team was to protect the new generation and to listen to those of the future. Participating in Mexica flower wars built a stronger sense of community at the NY2C program between the students. We were able to communicate with each other and focus our energy on one purpose. From this we would be able to apply the same skills we learn during the game to help enrich our communities. Being able to organize and communicate with people in our community allows use to cultivate the energy and discipline we need to create a more inclusive future for indigenous people all over the world. I had a good time though it was so hoooot up in there. it was funny also, I can’t wait to learn a lot more about…. everything. 

Packing List – 2017 Native Youth to College

Luggage Policy: Due to space limitations, all participants are allowed a maximum of two (2) pieces of luggage. This is a strict policy and the Native Youth to College Program will not be responsible for paying any luggage fees incurred by participants. A sleeping bag and bedding (Sheets, blankets, pillows, etc) are required.

Pitzer’s dormitory-style living quarters feature a bed, mattress, desk, chair, shelves, closet and set of drawers. At Wishtoyo, plan to layer clothing, as weather conditions tend to change from cool and damp in the mornings to bright, warm, and windy during the afternoons. On the trip to Wishtoyo, students will only be allowed to bring one (1) bag and a backpack.

All students will need to bring the following:
Very Important – Do Not Forget!
● Plastic Camping plate/cup/utensils – (dollar store has good options, it doesn’t have to be camping quality)
● A blanket or sleeping bag
● INHALERS if you have asthma/allergies!!!
● Necessary Medications

● Extra-long twin size sheets
● A pillow
● A towel
● Bathing suit
● Body soap/shampoo/conditioner
● Toothbrush/toothpaste
● Sunblock, personal, and feminine hygiene items
● Water Bottle
● Quarters for Laundry
● Hat
● Sunglasses & Regular Glasses and their cases
● Contact lenses and solution, case
● Closed toed Shoes (like Sneakers) – Required for WesternU!
● Flip Flops
● Day Pack or Backpack for supplies like notebooks, etc.
● Notebook, pens, pencils
● Regalia (Optional)
● Clothing appropriate for the program. This means no ripped clothing, nothing see-through, nothing with offensive writing or images, nothing too revealing or inappropriate (this means no mini skirts, too low tops, very baggy pants, etc.)

Maya!!!

Hey! I’m Maya. I’m of Taíno and mixed European descent, and have lived in Claremont all my life. I am an upcoming junior at Claremont High School, and I enjoy spending my time drumming, rock climbing, and teaching. I teach art with a volunteer program called artSTart to elementary age children. This program has led me to do things that I wasn’t even aware i was capable of (Such as speaking in front of the mayor, councilmen, AND  60 people) and I am so grateful for it. I’m not yet sure if I’d like to do art therapy or elementary school education, and am considering a double major in sociology and psychology. I am ecstatic to be back at Native Youth to College for the second time. Going to college is incredibly important to me, and being that Pitzer is my top choice, I couldn’t be happier to be here. I am so enthusiastic to be at a program that ties together native culture with my passion for education. 

2016 Recommendation Links Now Available

Good Morning Everyone!

It’s already February and just the other day it was January 1st, 2016!

Recommendation Links for both 2016 Mentor and Student Applications are now available.

Mentor Recommendation Link: http://forms.pitzer.edu/cec-mentor-recommendation-form/#gf_36

Student Recommendation Link: http://forms.pitzer.edu/cec-student-recommendation/

You can also find either of these by clicking on the 2016 Applications and then either the Student or Mentor Application tab in the Dropdown menu.

Please remember, you need 2 recommendations from someone who knows you and your work well – a teacher, a mentor, a boss, etc.

It’s never too early to ask for recommendations if you are applying for the program.

2016 Applications Are Out!

Okay, so the moment you all have been waiting for is here!

The 2016 Native Youth to College Applications are out!

We will be having both the Online and PDF version available. Right now, only the Online applications for both the mentors and the students are available. A PDF version to download will be coming soon. They can be accessed below.

Please go to the Application Page – https://nativeyouth2college.org/2016-applications/ – and select either drop down link for further information on the applications themselves, important dates, etc.

Important Due Dates for both:

  • Application Deadline                                                Friday, April 29th, 2016 at 5PM
  • Notification of Decision                                           Friday, May 13th, 2016 at 5PM

If you have any questions regarding the applications or anything else, please contact Program Director Scott Scoggins at 909.706.5948 or scott_scoggins@pitzer.edu.

Good luck and we look forward to reading all your applications.

Cinco de Maya

Today was a lot of fun, like always. I got to hold Courage (Rose’s bird) again, and we did many fun activities with rhythm. I love making my friends come up with me to the frontof the class.

SAM_1063

To be honest, apart from my museum video, making breakfast was my favorite part of the day. We made potatoes, eggs with soy chorizo, toast, and chilaquiles with cotija cheese on the side. It was spicy and delicious. It was the first time I was super full from breakfast. Miahuatl is the bomb.

We had the best dinner of the whole program this evening! There was actually tons of food for vegetarians today (aka Ninaya and I). We had vegetarian lasagna, zucchini with red sauce, garlic bread, and cobbler-ish stuff for dessert. Today was a GOOD food day.

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Native Culture and college education can 100% go together, as it is so obviously seen in the Pipeline. It just takes the respect of our cultures and teachers that know the ways. To go together, there must be a balance of Western and Native learning.

Today we went to the Pomona College Museum of Native Artifacts. The works were amazingly beautiful, but we all had a realization that was kind of- upsetting. Everyone who worked there was white, and the woman admitted to us that she knew very little at all about the pieces. That was, until our elder Joe came in. He immediately explained the significance of so many of the artifacts, and the cultures they were from. The works were hundreds or thousands of years old, and they were sitting in drawers in a basement that few people visit. There was one piece that stood out to me a bit more than all the others; a piece from as far back as 3000 BCE. She told us she knew nothing about it but that it was an adornment which had been taken from a burial ground.

SAM_1114

When you bury your dead, your elders…. you are doing it so to lay their physical body for rest. In many cultures, it is a very sacred practice to bury the dead with adornments or their belongings for their trip back to the afterlife, to heaven, to the Creator. Joe is so wise. He said to us, “I often wonder how white people would feel if I dug up their dead and kept their belongings in my basement.” My mentor Miahuatl kind of laughed and said, “It’s funny how these things are ours and we’re not even allowed to touch it.”

Frankly, Joe didn’t care whether or not we weren’t supposed to touch it.

SAM_1082

SAM_1085

They need to go back to their homes.