Thank Yous and Takeaways by James Fenelon

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The Native Youth to College program (NY2C) is now coming to an end it is appropriate to say a couple words of farewell. The first words go out to the elders which are the reason any of the activities within the program were possible. They did a great job of mixing fun with learning and deciding which times were appropriate for which. Julia, Scott, and the mentors did an excellent job of guiding the youth. Without them we would not have any foundations to build upon. From those foundations there were many takeaways from the program. NY2C wove together getting into college, college life, as well as importance of culture. Every student shined during the two weeks while we were together. I am going to miss all of the family I have gained here. Hopefully we do not forget one another and that our roads cross in the future. Notice how the final words are farewells and not goodbyes, this is because we will see each other in the future in one form or another.

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Beginning of the End of the Program: Tyvon Greyeyes

Sadly this day marks the beginning of the end for Mayan Math, Indigenous Games, and even Blogging. First I’d like to thank our elders Julia, and Mahti, our teachers Santos, Shelva, Angela, and Val for the life changing information that will benefit me in the future. We learned about Environmental Law, Applying for College, Mayan Math, and many more interesting topics that I will do my best to apply to my tribe and local community. The most impactful thing that I learned from this program was environmental law because it shows how much we need to improve the quality and beauty of our Mother Earth. Another topic that impacted me was when Bradley Henson came for a presentation about how we can mix western medicine with traditional medicine which opened my eyes to new ways to help our communities. Finally I’d like to thank all of those who provided this crazy fun experience for me and overall be my friends and teachers throughout the program.

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AQ Fresh Blog #1

Today is the eve of the arrival of the entire youth group. As the first four students have arrived, every one of the mentors has expressed excitement for what is in store. During lunch we had the wonderful opportunity to meet a few of the Lummi Students, Rolando, Issac, Nathen and Kayani. Though conversation with them was brief, the initial connections with them seem quite promising. Nathen, is a Boston Celtics fan. Something that would irk me if he were not my mentee because I am a Los Angeles Lakers fan (having grown up in Southern California and falling in love with basketball at the four years young). Needless to say these teams are historic rivals. Nevertheless, I see only positive things in store for the next two weeks.

Leaving Pitzer by Benjamin

Hector and John

Every morning we started it off with John and Hector playing the indigenous games. They taught us good self defense techniques. I would like to thank them for all they have done and all they have taught us. Each morning was tiring but those two guys helped out with waking us all up. Thank you so much Hector and John.

Vincente

Where do I even start off with him. He is full of so much knowledge and has been nice enough to share that with us. He taught me how to do many math problems on the Nepohualtzintzin. All the stories he knows about the truth of the tool is so amazing. I will keep working on learning more about the Nepohaultzintzin. He even taught us Aztec dancing, it’s so much fun! Vincente’s class was the best out of everyday here at pitzer. Thank you so much Vincente!!!

Shelva

Shelva has opened my eyes on how to become a better writer than I ever was before. She teaches everyday about writing and on how we could find the right college for us. Finding some colleges that fits for me was good. I liked how she always greeted us with a good attitude every time we came in through the door. Thank you Shelva for all you have done.

Auntie Julia

Antie Julia is the nicest person in the whole world! She gave me many gifts that I know I will cherish for the rest of my life. Even though she didn’t come a lot, I still had a great time with every moment I was with her. Thank you so much Auntie!

Wishtoyo people

Thank you letting us be on your land. Everyday was a good day, learning new things, having fun, swimming, making memories, and Nana’s food!! I had a blast at Wishtoyo for my first time being there. The activities were very nice and I learned a lot. Thank you so much!

Mentors

Bellmont : Thank you for letting me feel welcome and being there for me. I had an amazing experience being your mentee!I hope I’ll see you next year!!! I am thankful for the talks we had and the bond that will never be broken

Phil Phil Phil! : I had a good time laughing with you, and rapping with you! Thank you so much.

Neeka: We had some funny times, and some serious times. I liked how you agreed with the things I said and you are there for me. Thank you so much Neeka! P.S Thanks for the help with my essay.

Anna: We had some laughs here and there. I am thankful for all that you have done for me! P.S Thanks for the snacks!!

Laura : Thanks you for the conversations and laughs. You helped me with my writing and I am thankful. Thank you so much!

Zara : You are a cool person and I liked how we always laughed at things. Thank you for who you are, and for what you have done for me!

MIKA! : Thank you for all the help you have done! You’re a very smart person. Thank you so much!!

Student

Thank you so much for accepting me here!! You made me experience great!! I want to keep in contact with you all. HMU when y’all in Page! I will miss you all!!!

 

Packing List – 2017 Native Youth to College

Luggage Policy: Due to space limitations, all participants are allowed a maximum of two (2) pieces of luggage. This is a strict policy and the Native Youth to College Program will not be responsible for paying any luggage fees incurred by participants. A sleeping bag and bedding (Sheets, blankets, pillows, etc) are required.

Pitzer’s dormitory-style living quarters feature a bed, mattress, desk, chair, shelves, closet and set of drawers. At Wishtoyo, plan to layer clothing, as weather conditions tend to change from cool and damp in the mornings to bright, warm, and windy during the afternoons. On the trip to Wishtoyo, students will only be allowed to bring one (1) bag and a backpack.

All students will need to bring the following:
Very Important – Do Not Forget!
● Plastic Camping plate/cup/utensils – (dollar store has good options, it doesn’t have to be camping quality)
● A blanket or sleeping bag
● INHALERS if you have asthma/allergies!!!
● Necessary Medications

● Extra-long twin size sheets
● A pillow
● A towel
● Bathing suit
● Body soap/shampoo/conditioner
● Toothbrush/toothpaste
● Sunblock, personal, and feminine hygiene items
● Water Bottle
● Quarters for Laundry
● Hat
● Sunglasses & Regular Glasses and their cases
● Contact lenses and solution, case
● Closed toed Shoes (like Sneakers) – Required for WesternU!
● Flip Flops
● Day Pack or Backpack for supplies like notebooks, etc.
● Notebook, pens, pencils
● Regalia (Optional)
● Clothing appropriate for the program. This means no ripped clothing, nothing see-through, nothing with offensive writing or images, nothing too revealing or inappropriate (this means no mini skirts, too low tops, very baggy pants, etc.)

Hello everyone, nice to meet you. My name is Violet Marie Luxton and I am a Latinx-Indigenous artist, musician and activist. My traditional name is Tokoor hakii Shiraawáx which means “Woman who speaks” in Tongva. My ancestors come from the Penobscot Nation, and First Nations of Sinaloa and La Paz Mexico. I am of mixed European descent and hope the program will deepen my connection to my Native Heritage and pride.

I’m dyed-in-the-wool Southern Californian, deeply engaged in local movements for ecological and social justice. I am passionate about partnering with native communities across the region to reclaim and sustain our indigenous knowledge and culture.

I attended Pitzer College in Claremont, California, where I pioneered an independent major in Integrative Psychology. The program ignited my fascination for exploring creativity through technology – one of my favorite projects involved using computer science tools to measure the neurological impact of music. Since graduating in 2011, I’ve continued to synthesize my work in practices such as art making, gardening and meditation, linking disciplines that are too often siloed apart from each other as a way to find new paths toward healing and empowerment. My current work explores meta-materials for music mediation technology and gestural computing for augmented artistic expression.

With a love for music that borders on obsession, I’m currently sharpening my skills as a performer and creator while studying music theory and computer science at Pasadena City College. The experience has driven me to challenge the Eurocentrism and elitism that still dominate music education. My vision? A new kind of academy where indigenous knowledge is just as valued as “classical” texts, and where students challenge old dogmas to redefine “beauty” and “harmony” on their own terms.

I am also a dedicated yogi and a certified instructor in Kundalini Yoga. I have spent nearly a decade teaching yoga and meditation at college campuses, fitness studios, music festivals, and even prisons, where I share techniques to promote health and wholeness. I enjoy helping educators, nonprofits, students and soul seekers from all backgrounds reduce stress, enhance awareness and deepen their compassion.

Raised in a family with a strong legacy of Chicano activism, I was shaped by the stories of my parents, aunts and grandparents who battled against racism during the farmworker movements of the 60s and 70s. My experiences as an indigenous-latinix woman have deepened my resolve to dismantle oppression in all forms. I continue to campaign for worker and immigrant rights throughout California, and I’m currently active in local campaigns against environmental racism and pollution. On my spare time, I create online communities for digital feminists, and forge collaborations with local artists. I also love exploring the mountains and canyons of Southern California, and I’m determined to defend this sacred land from development and exploitation.

Aho!

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